Monthly Archives: May 2018

Laser App Software Announces Core Initiatives for 2013 Broker-Dealer Conference

Laser App Software Announces Core Initiatives for 2013 Broker-Dealer Conference

Laser App Software, the leading provider of forms automation and management software for the securities and insurance industries, today announced the key initiatives planned for the 2013 Broker-Dealer Conference. The conference will take place from August 21 through August 23 and will be held at the San Diego Marriott Marquis & Marina. The conference brings 300 broker-dealer executives and software providers into a collaborative environment to focus on technology trends and integrations.

Laser App has geared the 2013 conference around the optimization of working in a mobile practice. This is in response to the overwhelming industry push toward mobility. Everything from the “Advisor adoption of technology” presentation by author and industry expert Joel Bruckenstein, to demonstrations on integrations with the major custodians, to the e-sign acceptance presentation, and the recently produced software integrations with our partners are all geared toward broker-dealers supporting their reps in a mobile environment.

At last year’s event, Laser App released the Anywhere Platform its pure HTML mobile solution. This year, Laser App is unveiling a myriad of enhancements and integrations to the platform designed to meet the needs of both broker-dealers and advisors.

As always, there will be a blend of work and play. The evening event will be a casino cruise around the San Diego harbor where attendees will be treated to dinner, drinks, and their favorite table games. The Thursday lunchtime keynote speaker is Reggie Brown, a comedian and impressionist, known for his impersonation of President Barack Obama.

“Over the last 7 years, the Laser App conference has evolved from a user group meeting to a place where hundreds of broker-dealers come to learn and interact with each other and solution providers. I want every broker-dealer to leave the conference knowing where they’re headed and which solution providers can solve their problems, and I want them to enjoy themselves,” said Robert Powell, Vice President of Sales and Marketing for Laser App Software.

“The Laser App Conference has been incredibly useful for broker-dealers to learn more about technology advancements in the financial services industry. The conference is consistently high-energy and covers important topics such as straight-through-processing, integration, and mobile business processing. We look forward to the conference every year as a way to learn more about where we can improve our operations, and how technology can benefit our practice,” said Chris Shaw of ProEquities.

About Laser App Software
Laser App Software is the premier e-forms provider in the financial services industry. Laser app creates highly integrated solutions that combine state‐of‐the‐art forms-filling technology with its massive library of industry related forms.

Hacking with a Hacker

Hacking with a Hacker

What is it like to hack with one of the original hackers? It is certainly much different than what Appears to be the modern rendition of hacking. My experience was not getting really drunk with tons of junk food. It was not working on “beautiful” designs or “authentic” typography. It was not so much about sharing with the world as it was sharing with your peers. It had a very different feel to it than the “hacker culture” Promoted by some of the top technical Silicon Valley companies. It felt more “at home”, less dreamy, and more memorable.

I meet with Bill Gosper every so Often; I had the pleasure of giving him a tour of Facebook when I worked there. (He was so surprised that they had Coke in the glass bottles there, just like the old days.)

He is still very much a hacker, a thinker, a tinkerer, and a wonderer. Every time I meet up with him, he has a new puzzle for me, or someone around him, to solve, whether it’s really clever compass constructions, circle packing, block building, Game of Life automata solving, or even something more tangible like a Buttonhole homemade trap (which was affixed to my shirt for no less than two weeks!). He is also the bearer of interesting items, such as a belt buckle he gave me roomates depicts, in aluminum, a particular circle loose packing.
Gosper succeeding in tricking me with the Buttonhole Trap
When we meet up, all we do is hack. Along with him and one of his talented young students, we all work on something. Anything interesting, really. Last time we met up, we resurrected an old Lisp machine and did some software archeology. I brought over some of the manuals I own, like the great Chinual, and he brought over a dusty old 1U rackmount Alpha machine with OpenGenera installed. After passing a combination of Hurdles, such as that the keyboard was not interfacing with the computer Correctly, we finally got it to boot up. Now, I got to see with my own eyes, a time capsule containing a lot of Bill’s work from the 70s, 80s, and 90s, roomates could only be commanded and Examined through Zmacs dired and Symbolics Common Lisp. Our next goal was to get Symbolics Macsyma fired up on the old machine.

There was trouble with starting it up. License issues were one problem, finding and loading all of the files were compiled another. Running applications on a Lisp machine is very different than what we do today on modern machines, Windows or UNIX. There’s no. Exe file to click, or. App bundle to start up, or even a single. / File to execute. Usually it’s a collection of compiled “fast loading” or “fasl” files that get loaded side-by-side with the operating system. The application, in essence, Becomes a part of the OS.

In hacker tradition, we were Able to bypass the license issues by modifying the binary directly in Lisp. Fortunately, such as Lisp makes things easy disassembly. But how do we load the damn thing? Bill frustratingly muttered, “It’s been at least 20 years since I’ve done it. I just do not remember. “I, being an owner of MacIvory Symbolics Lisp machines, fortunately did remember how to load programs. “Bill, how about LOAD SYSTEM Macsyma?” He typed it into the native Lisp “Listener 2” window (we kept “Listener 1” for debugging), sometimes making a few typing mistakes, but finally succeeding, and then we saw the stream of files loading. We all Shouted in joy that progress was being made. I recall Bill was especially astounded at how fast everything was loading. This was on a fast Alpha machine with gobs of memory. It must have been much slower on the old 3600s they used back in the day.
The Lisp Machine Manual, or Chinual
It was all done after a few minutes, and Macsyma was loaded. To me, this was a sort of holy grail. I personally have Macsyma for Windows (which he uses in a VirtualBox machine on his 17 “MacBook), and I’ve definitely used Maxima. But Macsyma is something I’ve never seen. It was something that seems to have disappeared with history, something I have not been Able to find a copy of in the last decade.

Bill said, “let’s see if it works.” And he typed 1 +1; in, and sure enough, the result was 2. He saw I was bubbling with excitement and asked me if I’d like to try anything. “I’d love to,” and he handed the keyboard over to me and I typed in my canonical computer algebra test: integrate (sqrt (tan (x)), x);, roomates computes the indefinite integral
—- √ ∫ tanθ dθ
Out came the four-term typeset result of logarithms and arctangents, plus a fifth term I’d never seen before. “I’ve never seen any computer algebra system add that fifth term,” I said, “but it does not look incorrect.” The fifth term was a floored expression, Whose Increased value with the period of the function preceding it. “Let’s plot it,” Bill said. He plotted it using Macsyma’s menu interface, and it was what appeared to be an increasing, non-periodic function. I think we determined it was properly handled Because Macsyma branch cuts, with other systems have been known to be unorthodox about. It definitely had a pragmatic feel to it.

Now, Bill wanted to show us some interesting things; however all of Bill’s recent work Macsyma was on his laptop. How do we connect this ancient to a modern Macintosh hardware? We needed to get the machine onto the network, and networking with old machines is not my forte.

Fortunately, Stephen Jones, a friend of Bill’s and seemingly an expert at a rare combination of technical tasks, showed up. He Was able to do things that Neither Bill nor I could do on such an old machine. In only a few moments, he Was able to get Bill’s Mac talking to the Alpha, roomates shared a portion of its file system with Genera. “Will there be enough space on the Alpha for Macsyma my files?” Bill asked Stephen. “Of course, there’s ton’s of space.” We finally got Bill’s recent work transferred onto the machine.
Bill hacking in Macsyma in OpenGenera (Image courtesy of Stephen M. Jones)
We spent the rest of the night hacking on math. He Demonstrated to us what it was like to do a real mathematician’s work at the machine. He debuted some of his recent work. He went though a long chain of reasoning, showing us the line-after-line in Macsyma, number theoretic amazing to do things I’ve never seen before.

I did ask Bill why he does not publish more often. His previous publications have been landmarks: his algorithm for hypergeometric series and his summation algorithm for playing the Game of Life at light speed. He RESPONDED, “when there’s something interesting to publish, it’ll be published.” He seemed to have a sort of disdain for “salami science”, where scientific and mathematical papers present the thinnest possible “slice” or result possible.

Bill is certainly a man that thinks in a different way than most of us do. He is still hacking at mathematics, and still as impressive as before. I’m very fortunate to have met him, and I was absolutely delighted to see that even at 70 years old, his mind is still as sharp as can be, and it’s still being used to do interesting, Gosper-like mathematics.

And you would not believe it. We all were ready to head home at around 9 PM.

Tiny Books For The Macintosh Still No. 1 Despite MAC-Only Compatibility, Boffin Says

Tiny Books For The Macintosh Still No. 1 Despite MAC-Only Compatibility, Boffin Says

Tiny Books for the Macintosh

was announced as the top ranking Bookkeeping software by Boffin. The editors at the software review website after rigorous testing of numerous business finance management software, concluded on their top picks, with Tiny Books for the Macintosh ranked no.1 for a second consecutive time.

Bookkeeping software are a necessity for many small businesses and solo professionals who cannot afford hiring expensive accounting services. Bookkeeping software prove to be a reliable, affordable and quality solution for thousands of start-up companies and freelance professionals who opt for the do it yourself trend. Software for bookkeeping, despite being extremely advanced, they preserve their user-friendliness so that users with minimum to no accounting knowledge and skills can still work with the software easily.

Based on the reviews of bookkeeping software published by the Boffin team of editors, Tiny Books for Macintosh stood out of the competition despite being only MAC-compatible. The reviewers assert that it’s a rare occasion for a software not supporting all computer operating systems to be awarded the Boffin the no.1 place and the Boffin five-star award. Although it has been initially developed for home use, the software has been enriched with functions and accounting capacities that allow its use for entrepreneurs and small business owners, the Boffin editors emphasized.

For the editors at Boffin, Tiny Books for the Macintosh is an exemplary bookkeeping software that lets users easily and quickly manage their finance even if their accounting knowledge is limited. The software features a user-friendly interface and various quality features are which contributed in its high ranking.

The editors at Boffin issued a disclosure saying how the top three ranking software are to be evaluated on a regular basis to ensure all latest versions and releases are taken into consideration. To ensure the relevancy, accuracy and usefulness of the reviews, the Boffin editors carefully test each software, to offer their readers impartial and helpful software advice. Lastly, it has been mentioned that the top ranking software had only minor differences in overall performance, hinting at how future evaluations are likely to shuffle the present rankings.

Software Review Boffin reviews the latest technological products in demand on the market right now. They provide expert, honest and straightforward reviews so customers can objectively measure if a product, especially software is well worth it before making their purchase.

Parallel and Concurrent Programming in Haskell

Parallel and Concurrent Programming in Haskell

As one of the developers of the Glasgow Haskell Compiler (GHC) for almost 15 years, I have seen Haskell grow from a niche research language into a rich and thriving ecosystem. I spent a lot of that time working on GHC’s support for parallelism and concurrency. One of the first things I did to GHC in 1997 was to rewrite its runtime system, and a key decision we made at that time was to build concurrency right into the core of the system rather than making it an optional extra or an add-on library. I like to think this decision was founded upon shrewd foresight, but in reality it had as much to do with the fact that we found a way to reduce the overhead of concurrency to near zero (previously it had been on the order of 2%; we’ve always been performance-obsessed). Nevertheless, having concurrency be non-optional meant that it was always a first-class part of the implementation, and I’m sure that this decision was instrumental in bringing about GHC’s solid and lightning-fast concurrency support.

Haskell has a long tradition of being associated with parallelism. To name just a few of the projects, there was the pH variant of Haskell derived from the Id language, which was designed for parallelism, the GUM system for running parallel Haskell programs on multiple machines in a cluster, and the GRiP system: a complete computer architecture designed for running parallel functional programs. All of these happened well before the current multicore revolution, and the problem was that this was the time when Moore’s law was still giving us ever-faster computers. Parallelism was difficult to achieve, and didn’t seem worth the effort when ordinary computers were getting exponentially faster.

Around 2004, we decided to build a parallel implementation of the GHC runtime system for running on shared memory multiprocessors, something that had not been done before. This was just before the multicore revolution. Multiprocessor machines were fairly common, but multicores were still around the corner. Again, I’d like to think the decision to tackle parallelism at this point was enlightened foresight, but it had more to do with the fact that building a shared-memory parallel implementation was an interesting research problem and sounded like fun. Haskell’s purity was essential—it meant that we could avoid some of the overheads of locking in the runtime system and garbage collector, which in turn meant that we could reduce the overhead of using parallelism to a low-single-digit percentage. Nevertheless, it took more research, a rewrite of the scheduler, and a new parallel garbage collector before the implementation was really usable and able to speed up a wide range of programs. The paper I presented at the International Conference on Functional Programming (ICFP) in 2009 marked the turning point from an interesting prototype into a usable tool.

All of this research and implementation was great fun, but good-quality resources for teaching programmers how to use parallelism and concurrency in Haskell were conspicuously absent. Over the last couple of years, I was fortunate to have had the opportunity to teach two summer school courses on parallel and concurrent programming in Haskell: one at the Central European Functional Programming (CEFP) 2011 summer school in Budapest, and the other the CEA/EDF/INRIA 2012 Summer School at Cadarache in the south of France. In preparing the materials for these courses, I had an excuse to write some in-depth tutorial matter for the first time, and to start collecting good illustrative examples. After the 2012 summer school I had about 100 pages of tutorial, and thanks to prodding from one or two people (see the Acknowledgments), I decided to turn it into a book. At the time, I thought I was about 50% done, but in fact it was probably closer to 25%. There’s a lot to say! I hope you enjoy the results.

Audience

You will need a working knowledge of Haskell, which is not covered in this book. For that, a good place to start is an introductory book such as Real World Haskell (O’Reilly), Programming in Haskell (Cambridge University Press), Learn You a Haskell for Great Good! (No Starch Press), or Haskell: The Craft of Functional Programming (Addison-Wesley).

How to Read This Book

The main goal of the book is to get you programming competently with Parallel and Concurrent Haskell. However, as you probably know by now, learning about programming is not something you can do by reading a book alone. This is why the book is deliberately practical: There are lots of examples that you can run, play with, and extend. Some of the chapters have suggestions for exercises you can try out to get familiar with the topics covered in that chapter, and I strongly recommend that you either try a few of these, or code up some of your own ideas.

As we explore the topics in the book, I won’t shy away from pointing out pitfalls and parts of the system that aren’t perfect. Haskell has been evolving for over 20 years but is moving faster today than at any point in the past. So we’ll encounter inconsistencies and parts that are less polished than others. Some of the topics covered by the book are very recent developments: Chapters 4, 5, 6, and pass:[14 cover frameworks that were developed in the last few years.

The book consists of two mostly independent parts: Part I and Part II. You should feel free to start with either part, or to flip between them (i.e., read them concurrently!). There is only one dependency between the two parts: Chapter 13 will make more sense if you have read Part I first, and in particular before reading “The ParIO monad”, you should have read Chapter 4.

While the two parts are mostly independent from each other, the chapters should be read sequentially within each part. This isn’t a reference book; it contains running examples and themes that are developed across multiple chapters.

Review: Seagate Wireless Plus

Review: Seagate Wireless Plus

The storage capacity is relatively limited tablet often makes us have to be smart to choose which content you want to keep in it. Not realizing it, remove and insert the digital content such as music video and it turns out that quite a lot of time consuming.
Well, one of the more clever solution is to use an external hard disk as Wi-Fi. Seagate Wireless Plus (SWP) is the replacement for the Seagate GoFlex Wireless (SGW) which appeared in 2011. There are some improvements that are owned SWP as larger capacity, longer battery life, as well as support for streaming 8 connections at once. The size is also smaller than SGW, and attractive, the price is not much different from SGW.
To fill the data into SWP, you just connect it to a PC via a fast USB 3.0 connection. If desired, you can replace with Thunderbolt or Firewire connector (sold separately). SWP is very easy to operate. You simply press the on / off button is there, then set your device to connect via Wi-Fi access point to the SWP. While connected to the SWP, you can still connect to the Internet by connecting the device to a Wi-Fi hotspot through SeagateMedia application available free on Play Store and AppStore.
Review: Seagate Wireless Plus review gadget mobile gadget accessories Review: Seagate Wireless Plus review gadget mobile gadget accessories Review: Seagate Wireless Plus review gadget mobile gadget accessories
Wireless Plus has been arranged with several standard folders such as Videos, Music, Photos, and Documents. But you can create your own folders if desired. SeagateMedia application quite well, but does not support all video formats. To music, more fully supported formats. As for the documents, Seagate will ask what application you want to use to open the document. I tried it on the Galaxy Note 10.1 and the Apple iPad 3. The results are quite varied and SWP proved more smoothly used in the Android platform, especially for video playback.
seagate wireless plus 1 Review: Seagate Wireless Plus review gadget mobile gadget accessories
Review: Seagate Wireless Plus
Full HD video in a streaming format. MP4 can be done smoothly, while for the format. Above 1GB MKV, a little choked up. This is not a problem in the SWP, but more to the software problem. Fortunately
You can use other applications to play the video. SWP battery is claimed to last up to 10 hours. But if you continue to take streaming video, then the battery will be filled after 6-7 hours. If it varies, then the battery will be able to last up to 9-10 hours.
Seagate Wireless Plus is an easy to use, very handy, and will remain relevant for longer than a new gadget you bought. The price is quite high, but the ability is quite worth it.

Hackers use Dropbox, WordPress to spread malware

Hackers use Dropbox, WordPress to spread malware

The Chinese cyberspies behind the widely publicized espionage campaign against The New York Times have added Dropbox and WordPress to their bag of spear-phishing tricks.

The gang, known in security circles as the DNSCalc gang, has been using the Dropbox file-sharing service for roughly the last 12 months as a mechanism for spreading malware, said Rich Barger, chief intelligence officer for Cyber Squared. While the tactic is not unique, it remains under the radar of most companies.

“I wouldn’t say it’s new,” Barger said on Thursday. “It’s just something that folks aren’t really looking at or paying attention to.”

The gang is among 20 Chinese groups identified this year by security firm Mandiant thatlaunch cyberattacks against specific targets to steal information. In this case, the DNSCalc gang was going after intelligence on individuals or governments connected to the Association of Southeast Asian Nations. ASEAN is a non-governmental group that represents the economic interests of ten Southeast Asian countries.

The attackers did not exploit any vulnerabilities in Dropbox or WordPress. Instead, they opened up accounts and used the services as their infrastructure.

The gang uploaded on Dropbox a .ZIP file disguised as belonging to the U.S.-ASEAN Business Council. Messages were then sent to people or agencies that would be interested in the draft of a Council policy paper. The paper, contained in the file, was legitimate, Barger said.

When a recipient unzipped the file, they saw another one that read, “2013 US-ASEAN Business Council Statement of Priorities in the US-ASEAN Commercial Relationship Policy Paper.scr.” Clicking on the file would launch a PDF of the document, while the malware opened a backdoor to the host computer in the background.

Once the door was open, the malware would reach out to a WordPress blog created by the attackers. The blog contained the IP address and port number of a command and control server that the malware would contact to download additional software.

Dropbox is a desirable launchpad for attacks because employees of many companies use the service. “People trust Dropbox,” Barger said.

For companies that have the service on its whitelist, malware moving from Dropbox won’t be detected by a company’s intrusion prevention systems. Also, communications to a WordPress blog would likely go undetected, since it would not be unusual behavior for any employee with access to the Internet.

In general, no single technology can prevent such an attack. “There’s no silver bullet here,” Barger said.

The best prevention is for security pros to share information when their companies are targeted, so others can draw up their own defense, he said.

In The New York Times attack, the hackers penetrated the newspaper’s systems in September 2012 and worked undercover for four months before they were detected.

The attack coincided with an investigative piece the newspaper published on business dealings that reaped several billion dollars for the relatives of Wen Jiabao, China’s prime minister.

Software maker E2open plans more revenue, less BlackBerry

Software maker E2open plans more revenue, less BlackBerry

Supply chain management software maker E2open Inc (EOPN.O) expects its revenue to hit $100 million for the first time next fiscal year, after replacing its dependence on BlackBerry Ltd (BB.TO) and PC makers with a host of new customers.

Chief Executive Mark Woodward said he expected E2open, which went public a year ago, to boost its sales in the 12 months to February 2015 after adding up to 20 new enterprise customers in the current fiscal year.

“We do $80 million (in revenue) this year and we grow 30 percent next year. That should get us there,” Woodward said in an interview, referring to the $100-million revenue target.

E2open, which makes cloud-based software designed to assist companies in managing their supply chains, has more than doubled its annual revenue in the five years since Woodward took charge. Revenue in the fiscal year to February 28, 2013, was $75 million.

The company’s shares have risen about 35 percent since they began trading on the Nasdaq on July 26 last year.

Three of the six analysts covering E2open have a “strong buy” rating on the stock. The other three rate it “buy”, according to Thomson Reuters data. The company has a market capitalization of $460 million.

With a customer base that includes Coca-Cola Co (KO.N), Unilever Plc (ULVR.L), IBM (IBM.N) and Cisco Systems Inc (CSCO.O), E2open has been diversifying to cut its dependence on any one large customer.

Last year, that customer was Canadian smartphone maker BlackBerry (BBRY.O).

Woodward said he expected BlackBerry’s contribution to E2open’s revenue to fall to less than 3 percent in the current fiscal year from nearly 15 percent last year.

BlackBerry, which pioneered on-the-go email with its handsets and messaging systems, has slipped into tough times as it struggles to keep pace with nimbler rivals.

Woodward said BlackBerry’s quarterly shipments of about 7 million units were between a quarter and a third of the volume contracted when it became a customer of E2open four years ago.

“Their usage of our systems, just because they are selling less handsets, has come down dramatically,” said Woodward.

E2open has, on average, signed up 17 enterprise customers in each of the last two years. In total, it has 76 enterprise customers – those which buy E2open’s software as well as pay for access to its network of suppliers and trading partners.

Computer maker Dell Inc (DELL) brought in 22.5 percent of E2open’s revenue in fiscal 2011. Now, it accounts for less than 5 percent – even though its contribution in dollar terms has risen, Woodward said.

“The original deal that we signed with Dell was for $3.2 million for three years,” he said. “The last bill we signed with Dell was for $3.2 million per year.”

British mobile telephone company Vodafone Group Plc (VOD.L) (VOD.O) is the largest customer for Foster City, California-based E2open, having contributed 12.1 percent of the company’s revenue last fiscal year.

Another customer, Seagate Technology LLC (STX.O), held a 9 percent stake in E2open as of December last year.

Windows 8.1 Enterprise Preview Reflects the Growing Trend of Working Remotely

Windows 8.1 Enterprise Preview Reflects the Growing Trend of Working Remotely

Microsoft unleashed Windows 8.1 Enterprise Preview today. The early look at the enterprise version of Windows 8.1 follows the release of Windows 8.1 Preview at Microsoft’s BUILD conference last month, and includes a variety of tools that show Microsoft’s commitment to both BYOD and virtualization.

Aside from the slew of changes and enhancements in the regular Windows 8.1 Preview edition, Windows 8.1 Enterprise Preview also includes features uniquely designed for business customers. Windows 8.1 Enterprise Preview adds business-friendly elements like Direct Acess, and BranchCache. It also provides IT admins with the power to configure and lock down the Start screen on Windows 8 clients.

Microsoft also has tools in Windows 8.1 Enterprise Preview to help out with BYOD and virtualization: Windows To Go, and Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI). Windows To Go lets the company put an entire managed Windows 8 desktop environment on a bootable USB thumb drive, and VDI gives the business the tools to enable users to use critical business software from virtually any Internet-connected device.

One of the hottest trends in business technology today is mobility and working remotely. The driving forces behind working remotely are the “bring your own device” (BYOD) trend and virtualization.

More and more companies are embracing BYOD and allowing (or requiring) employees to provide their own PCs and mobile devices. BYOD can be a cost-cutting measure for the company, because the employee is taking on some (or all) of the burden of purchasing the PC. BYOD enables users to be more productive and have higher job satisfaction because they get to use the hardware they prefer, and are more comfortable with.

BYOD also introduces some unique concerns, though, when it comes to enforcing policies and protecting company data. Regardless of its benefits, companies can’t just let employees connect rogue computers to the network, or store sensitive company data on a personal PC without any protection. The nice thing about Windows To Go is that it turns any Windows 7 or Windows 8 device into a managed Windows 8 PC without installing any additional software, or putting the personal applications or data of the employee at risk.

Another factor in working remotely is virtualization. Whether hosted locally or in the cloud,virtual servers allow the company to maximize the value from its investment in hardware, and adapt quickly to changing demand or business needs. From an endpoint perspective, virtual applications, or virtual desktop are more valuable. A virtual desktop infrastructure like in Windows 8.1 Enterprise simplifies deployment and management of software because the company only has to install and maintain it in one place. At the same time, it helps the users get more done even on older or weaker hardware because much of the processing overhead is handled on the server end.

Small and medium businesses have a lot to gain from both BYOD and virtualization. The features and capabilities of Windows 8.1 Enterprise Preview demonstrate Microsoft’s commitment to keeping SMB customers on the cutting edge.

Twitter Yields 25,300 Tweets ‘Royal Baby’ per Minute

Twitter Yields 25,300 Tweets ‘Royal Baby’ per Minute

London – Twitter flooded with tweets about the birth of the couple’s first child Prince William-Kate Middleton. These social media platforms stating royal baby be a global trending topic with 25,300 tweets per minute.

Peak in the global conversation on Twitter came in at 20:37 am London time, a few minutes after the official announcement of the birth holds a couple Duke and Duchess of Cambridge. Since Monday night, more than 2 million people mention news of the birth of her baby’s future king on Twitter.

According to the Hollywood Reporter, the number of royal baby tweet tweet beat 120 thousand while Andy Murray won the prestigious Wimbledon tennis match.

Residents Twitter using the hastag specifically to associate with the royal birth. Generally, they use a hashtag like # RoyalBaby, # RoyalBabyBoy, and # RoyalBabyWatch.

According to a statement Twitter, since Middleton entered the hospital Monday morning with Prince William at her side, the hashtag # RoyalBaby itself has been used more than 900 thousand times on Twitter on Monday night. Tweet about royal baby news sent from all over the world, with the highest volume of conversation coming from the United States, Britain, Canada, France, and Italy.

Twitter Sensor Feature Release Pornography

Twitter Sensor Feature Release Pornography

San Francisco – Twitter introduced reforms for iOS and Android application on July 17, 2013. The update was a method of censorship of sensitive content, such as pornography and violence, which appeared in the early post-twit.
If Twitter states that an image or a video containing sensitive issues, Twitter will display a label containing the message. Users must click if you want to see the media.
Message in the label reads, “Media in circulation could contain sensitive content. Twit media settings can be set to inform you if the media contains sensitive content.” Then the user can click “View,” or “Always show my sensitive media.”
New features began to appear in the July 2013. Users can also tag pictures or video as a medium sensitive to the setting. So, Twitter can give a warning to others before they click the image or video that you post.
This is a simple way to keep Twitter users more comfortable and not bothered with unwanted content. Especially for the user of Twitter among children and adolescents.